How Trick or Treaters Can Stay Safe on Halloween
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How Trick or Treaters Can Stay Safe on Halloween

Little children in Halloween costumesFor a child, Halloween is an exciting time to get dressed up and acquire as much sugary loot as possible. But for parents, Halloween can be a bit scary. They know that, in the midst of the goblins and witches roaming the streets lurks a real danger: The potential for pedestrian accidents. Compared to other days of the year, twice as many young pedestrians are killed on Halloween. That’s according to Safe Kids Worldwide, which also notes that about 12% of kids five years of age and younger are allowed to go trick or treating without their parents.

How old is old enough to go out alone?

One of the most effective ways to keep your child safe on Halloween is to go out trick or treating together. You know your child best. Consider your child’s maturity level and awareness of traffic hazards when deciding how old is old enough for your child to go out without you. Generally, it’s recommended that all kids ages 12 and younger be accompanied by an adult.

How can parents choose the safest possible costumes?

There are a lot of safety hazards to consider when choosing a Halloween costume, including flammability and whether toxic materials are a concern. But in terms of traffic safety, the number one consideration is visibility. Choose a costume with lighter colors and add reflective tape. You can also give your child a glow stick, but only if your child is old enough not to bite it. Hundreds of children have been treated in the ER for ingesting the fluid inside glow sticks. Another option is a string of blinking LED lights that is intended to be worn around the neck.

Talking about traffic safety with your child

Before every Halloween, sit down with your child for a traffic safety talk. No matter how old your child is or whether you’re going out together, your child can benefit from being reminded of the potential hazards. Remind your child to always travel on the sidewalks, look both ways before crossing a street, and assume that drivers can’t see them. Your child should also know that Halloween is a prime time for drunk driving. Even if your child is crossing at a red light, your child must wait for an approaching car to completely stop—just in case the driver is impaired and runs the stop light.

What to do next if your child was injured

The serious injury of a child is every parent’s worst nightmare. Always rush your child to the ER or call 911 right away. Even if your child insists that he or she isn’t seriously injured, there could be internal injuries that you can’t detect.

When the dust has settled and you’re starting to think about holding the responsible party accountable for their negligent or reckless actions, Ellis Injury Law is here to help. Our car accident lawyers in Los Angeles are seasoned litigators who routinely handle pedestrian accident lawsuits. We can help your family move forward from the accident by seeking compensation on your behalf. Call today 888-675-8254 to request a free consultation.

Additional resources for pedestrian safety on Halloween:

  1. Safe Kids Worldwide, Quick Tips for a Safe Halloween, https://www.safekids.org/infographic/quick-tips-safe-halloween
  2. National Safety Council, Halloween Safety On and Off the Road, https://www.nsc.org/home-safety/tools-resources/seasonal-safety/autumn/halloween