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Los Angeles Actos Attorney

Actos Bladder Cancer

  • Issue: Increased risk of bladder cancer

Ellis Law has represented persons who took the prescription drug pioglitazone, sold under the brand name Actos, and developed bladder cancer. Physicians prescribe Actos to treat patients with Type 2 Diabetes. We are also investigating cases for patients prescribed Actos who developed prostate cancer. Japan-based Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. is the manufacturer of Actos.

In the first trial of an Actos lawsuit brought by a patient who developed terminal bladder cancer after taking Actos, a California jury awarded $6.5 million to Jack Cooper and his wife. After more than a week of deliberations, the Los Angeles Superior Court panel returned verdicts on April 25, 2013, and found that Takeda failed to adequately disclose Actos’ link to bladder cancer.

Actos Bladder Cancer Link and Pioglitazone Side Effects

In June 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a drug safety alert warning that the use of Actos for more than one year may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. At the same time, health authorities in France suspended the use of Actos due to the risk of developing bladder cancer.

In April 2012, Health Canada, the government drug safety agency for Canada, issued a safety warning on Actos. Diabetes patients prescribed Actos for over a year had two times higher risk of bladder cancer than diabetes patients not taking Actos.

Manufacturers of prescription drugs have a duty to patients to produce safe products and to warn patients and their doctors of any adverse health effects. The lawsuits filed by Actos patients with cancer charge that Takeda violated both of these duties and, as a result, that Takeda is legally responsible for the harm they have suffered and must pay damages.

The Actos complaints charge that prior to the drug’s introduction to the market in 1999, Takeda possessed studies on laboratory animals showing an increased risk of bladder cancer when the animals were provided the drug. Takeda allegedly failed to disclose these laboratory test results to health regulators.

Upon approval of Actos in 1999, the FDA directed Takeda to undertake a post-marketing study on the safety and effectiveness of Actos. However, Takeda allegedly delayed initiating the study until 2003 and designed the study as a 10-year trial. Because of this study design, the final results will not be available until after the expiration of Takeda’s exclusive patent on Actos. However, interim results published in 2011 did show increased risk of bladder cancer.

In 2005, the results of another study Takeda conducted on Actos were published. This study was intended to show cardiovascular benefits from taking Actos. This study found 14 bladder cancers among patients in the Actos group, compared to 5 bladder cancers in the group that did not take Actos. Takeda again denied that Actos was to blame for the higher rate of cancer.

To this day, the warning label on Actos states: “There are too few events of bladder cancer to establish causality.”

Actos Lawsuits: Legal Rights of Patients Injured by Actos

Persons who have been seriously injured by a prescription drug with dangerous and undisclosed side effects may bring claims against the pharmaceutical company that manufactured the drug. The claims that may be brought can include claims for strict liability for a defective product, breach of warranty, negligence, and misrepresentation. Damages may include:

  • Physical pain and suffering, mental anguish and physical impairment;
  • Medical expenses associated with efforts to remedy the injuries as a result of the original surgery; and
  • Loss of earnings and/or earning capacity.

In the case of a patient’s death, the family of the victim may file a wrongful death action and seek damages.

Contact ELLIS LAW

If you or a loved one have developed bladder cancer, prostate cancer, or another serious disease while taking Actos, or are a relative of a patient who died after being prescribed Actos, please contact an Actos lawyer at ELLIS LAW. We have successfully represented tens of thousands of clients in personal injury and dangerous prescription drugs cases across America.

Or you may call us toll-free at 1-800-INJURED and ask to speak to attorney. We will confidentially evaluate your case for free and without any obligation.

Trademark Notice

Actos is a registered trademark of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. The use of this trademark is solely for product identification and informational purposes. Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. is not affiliated with this website, and Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. has no affiliation with Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP. Nothing on this site has been authorized or approved by Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd.

Ellis Law: Have you been a victim of the drug Yasmin?

Los Angeles Yasmin Attorney; Yasmin Lawsuit Attorneys

The birth control market is booming, and while people could point to any number of reasons for it, the bottom line is that the competition in the industry is as intense as it has ever been. As a result, more and more companies are releasing products designed to prevent unwanted pregnancies, and one of them, Bayer Healthcare, released a product onto the market in 2001 called Yasmin.

Below you’ll find information regarding how Yasmin works, the problems that arose in conjunction with its use, the general reaction from the public to the reports of these problems and ultimately how you should proceed if you or someone you love has been harmed as a result of using Yasmin.

Yasmin – Birth Control Pill

Yasmin is a birth control product that is provided in pill form and is administered via prescription. It was originally approved for marketing, sale and distribution in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on May 11, 2001, and since then it has generated billions of dollars in revenue.

Yasmin works by performing two functions in the female’s body:

  1. It prevents ovulation as it naturally occurs within the reproductive system;
    -and-
  2. It prompts slight changes in the walls of the uterus and the cervix that prevent a fertilized egg from attaching to the uterus and beginning the process of growth.

In a scientific sense, Yasmin accomplishes these tasks by releasing small amounts of two hormones into the female’s system. These hormones are known as drospirenone and ethinylestradiol, and they are the active ingredients in Yasmin that basically control its functions. Generally, Yasmin showed positive results in those who used it in its early stages on the market, although eventually problems began to arise.

Yasmin Side Effects Linked to Birth Control

Unfortunately for many users of Yasmin, negative reports of side effects eventually began to surface at a volume where the public began to take notice and defective drugs attorneys began to field incoming inquiries regarding the injuries caused. Specifically, Yasmin has been known to lead to the following side effects in some women:

  • Heart attacks
  • Strokes
  • Kidney damage
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)
  • Pulmonary Embolisms
  • Death

While each of these side effects is obviously severe, two in particular are at least loosely linked. Those two side effects are DVT and pulmonary embolisms. DVT is a condition whereby blood clots form deep in the tissue of the body, usually in the legs. When these clots grow to the point where they break off and travel through the circulatory system, they tend to settle in the tissue of the lungs. Clots that exist in the lung tissue are called pulmonary embolisms, and each of these conditions can be not only dangerous but eventually fatal if they are not promptly diagnosed and treated.

Yasmin Lawyer and Yasmin Attorney

Generally, when a drug encounters problems, the reaction to these problems pass through a common progression, and in regards to Yasmin, it’s still early in that process. As of now, the federal government has not issued any requirements to attach warnings to the product nor has it required that a recall be initiated, but Yasmin has been caught in the crosshairs of several state law enforcement agencies.

Specifically, Yasmin was the subject of an aggressive marketing campaign that generally ran on television. In these advertisements, claims were made that were seen as false and images and music were run that were intended to distract the viewer from potential side effects. In the years 2003, 2008 and 2009, the FDA issued warning letters to the manufacturers of Yasmin alerting them to the potential for liability for false advertising. As many as 27 Attorneys General of different states were also part of this warning process. In response to the warnings, Yasmin advertisements were pulled from the airwaves.

Aside from the problems with its advertising efforts, women who were injured and who suffered from any of the side effects above also began to file civil lawsuits for damages that were suffered, and some of these injuries were irreversible. Since then, more people have taken notice of these problems and more lawsuits continue to be filed.

Yasmin Injury Lawsuit

If you or someone you love has used Yasmin and suffered from the development of side effects, you need to take action immediately to protect your legal rights. That starts by contacting a defective drugs attorney who understands the intricacies of these types of claims, as you need honest answers regarding your situation. Contact the attorneys at Ellis Law today at 1-800-INJURED or contact us online to schedule a free initial consultation in order to get this process started.

Prescription Errors: The Wrong Drug

Nowadays, there seems to be a pill for just about everything. For those of us lucky enough not to be sick, pharmaceutical companies will happily sell us drugs to fend off a multitude of potential maladies. Unlike in the past, when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) came under constant criticism for taking too long to authorize new drugs, it now approves them at a record-setting pace.

More Drugs, More Risk

A growing variety of diseases and conditions can now be treated or controlled with drugs. What is more, the demand for prescription medicines increases as our population ages. Today’s elderly consume more than a third of all prescription drugs. In fact, the average senior citizen fills 38.5 prescriptions annually. Since 1992, the number of prescription medicines dispensed at retail pharmacies has more than doubled, from 2 billion to over 4 billion per year. For any one ailment there may exist as many as a dozen medications. With such high demand and such an enormous array of medicines at their fingertips, pharmacists are bound to make mistakes.

The Most Common Prescription Error

Medication errors kill as many as 7,000 Americans per year. The job of the pharmacists begins with a careful reading and interpretation of the prescription. At times, however, a doctor’s handwriting is unclear and difficult to decipher. In such cases, pharmacists should contact the prescribing physician for clarification, but they don’t always take the time to do so. For example, in one case, a pharmacist misread a prescription for antibiotics and dispensed an anti-diabetic instead, causing serious health problems for the patient. Supplying the wrong drug is the medication error that occurs most often in our nation’s pharmacies.

Drug retailers often employ technicians to assist pharmacists. Without close supervision from a trained and experienced pharmacist, technicians have been known to select the wrong bottle from the shelf and count out the wrong pills. Pharmacists must check and re-check the work of technicians in order to avert potentially disastrous results.

The Problem of the ‘Look Alike’ Drug Name

One of the most perplexing medication errors arises from the prevalence of ‘look alike’ drug names. Prilosec may be mistaken for Prozac, Navane for Norvasc, or Lasix for Losec. A prescription for Celebrex, an anti-arthritis drug, may be interpreted as one for Cerebryx, an anti-seizure medication, or Celexa, an anti-depressant. In an Elizabeth, NJ Shop-Rite pharmacy, a 73 year-old woman was given chlorpropamide, a drug designed to lower blood sugar, instead of chlorpromazine, an anti-psychotic medication. The patient was already taking an anti-diabetic drug and the mistaken prescription caused her blood sugar to plummet to dangerously low levels. A cascade of health problems followed: respiratory failure, intestinal bleeding and a drug resistant bacterial infection contracted during her hospital stay. Drug companies that spend tens of millions of dollars promoting and marketing their products often balk at changing the name of the medication, even under pressure from the FDA.

More Drugs, Less Time, More Errors

The sheer volume of prescriptions waiting to be filled at any given pharmacy means overworked pharmacists and a vastly increased margin for error. Unfortunately, there is no pill that will make prescription mistakes disappear.

If you or a loved one has been harmed by receiving the wrong drug from a pharmacist, contact the firm for a thorough and knowledgeable consultation.Nowadays, there seems to be a pill for just about everything. For those of us lucky enough not to be sick, pharmaceutical companies will happily sell us drugs to fend off a multitude of potential maladies. Unlike in the past, when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) came under constant criticism for taking too long to authorize new drugs, it now approves them at a record-setting pace.

More Drugs, More Risk

A growing variety of diseases and conditions can now be treated or controlled with drugs. What is more, the demand for prescription medicines increases as our population ages. Today’s elderly consume more than a third of all prescription drugs. In fact, the average senior citizen fills 38.5 prescriptions annually. Since 1992, the number of prescription medicines dispensed at retail pharmacies has more than doubled, from 2 billion to over 4 billion per year. For any one ailment there may exist as many as a dozen medications. With such high demand and such an enormous array of medicines at their fingertips, pharmacists are bound to make mistakes.

The Most Common Prescription Error

Medication errors kill as many as 7,000 Americans per year. The job of the pharmacists begins with a careful reading and interpretation of the prescription. At times, however, a doctor’s handwriting is unclear and difficult to decipher. In such cases, pharmacists should contact the prescribing physician for clarification, but they don’t always take the time to do so. For example, in one case, a pharmacist misread a prescription for antibiotics and dispensed an anti-diabetic instead, causing serious health problems for the patient. Supplying the wrong drug is the medication error that occurs most often in our nation’s pharmacies.

Drug retailers often employ technicians to assist pharmacists. Without close supervision from a trained and experienced pharmacist, technicians have been known to select the wrong bottle from the shelf and count out the wrong pills. Pharmacists must check and re-check the work of technicians in order to avert potentially disastrous results.

The Problem of the ‘Look Alike’ Drug Name

One of the most perplexing medication errors arises from the prevalence of ‘look alike’ drug names. Prilosec may be mistaken for Prozac, Navane for Norvasc, or Lasix for Losec. A prescription for Celebrex, an anti-arthritis drug, may be interpreted as one for Cerebryx, an anti-seizure medication, or Celexa, an anti-depressant. In an Elizabeth, NJ Shop-Rite pharmacy, a 73 year-old woman was given chlorpropamide, a drug designed to lower blood sugar, instead of chlorpromazine, an anti-psychotic medication. The patient was already taking an anti-diabetic drug and the mistaken prescription caused her blood sugar to plummet to dangerously low levels. A cascade of health problems followed: respiratory failure, intestinal bleeding and a drug resistant bacterial infection contracted during her hospital stay. Drug companies that spend tens of millions of dollars promoting and marketing their products often balk at changing the name of the medication, even under pressure from the FDA.

More Drugs, Less Time, More Errors

The sheer volume of prescriptions waiting to be filled at any given pharmacy means overworked pharmacists and a vastly increased margin for error. Unfortunately, there is no pill that will make prescription mistakes disappear.

If you or a loved one has been harmed by receiving the wrong drug from a pharmacist, contact the firm for a thorough and knowledgeable consultation.